Courses of Instruction in Biological and Physical Sciences

Number Title Credits Description
BIO 101 Introduction to Biology and Lab 4 This course is an introduction to the chemistry and metabolism of living organisms.  Study of the scientific method, principles of ecology and genetics, the structural and physiological features of plant and animal cells and tissues and the principles of animal classification and evolutionary relationships will be included.  Laboratory exercises designed to underscore these principles will accompany lecture material.
BIO 102 General Botany and Lab  4 A survey of the plant kingdom with emphasis placed on morphology, physiology, taxonomic relationships including ecological and evolutionary principles.  Field trips are taken, and plants and trees on the campus are studied.  Prerequisite:  BIO 101.
BIO 103 General Zoology and Lab 4 A survey of the animal kingdom with emphasis placed on morphology, physiology, taxonomic relationships including ecological and evolutionary principles.  Laboratory included.  Prerequisite:  BIO 101.
BIO 104 Human Ecology 4 An introduction to the terminology, methodology, and worldview of biological science and the principles of ecology through a consideration of the impact of modern technology on the environment.  Human Ecology is a biology course primarily for the nonscientist.
BIO 203 Genetics and Lab 4 A study of the structure and function of DNA.  The structure of genes and how they are used and regulated will be stressed, as well as the role of DNA as the foundation of heredity.  Problem solving using classical Mendelian patterns of inheritance and variations on these patterns will be performed.  Other topics include biotechnology, population genetics and the role of genetics in disease.  Molecular genetic techniques and their applications in biotechnology will be stressed in the laboratory portion of the course.  Prerequisites:  BIO 101 and one other BIO course, or permission of instructor.
BIO 204, 205 Human Anatomy and Physiology and Lab  I, II 4,4 A detailed study of the structure and function of the human body, its organs, and systems.  BIO 204 includes the levels of organization found in the body, metabolism, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous system.  BIO 205 includes the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, fluid and electrolyte balance, and reproductive system.  Lab included.   Prerequisites:  BIO 101 with a grade of C or better, or BIO 101 and BIO 103, or permission of instructor.
BIO 215 Environmental Science and Lab 4 The study of the interdependency and interconnectedness related to power (fossil fuel, nuclear, solar, and other alternatives).  Air and water pollution, waste generation and disposal, wetlands, soils, and chemicals and water and sewage treatment methods will be discussed.  Laboratory exercises related to these topics will be conducted.
BIO 301 Microbiology and Lab 4 A study of the structure, classification, and function of micro-organisms as related to public health, industrial processes, and their roles in nature.  Basic techniques are introduced in the laboratory, including isolation and identification of representative organisms.  Prerequisites:  BIO 101 with a grade of C or better, or BIO 101 and one other BIO course, or permission of instructor.
BIO 302 Immunology and Lab 4 A study of the biological, chemical and genetic basis of the human immune response to various diseases.  Critical reading of classical and current scientific literature will be stressed in the laboratory portion of the course.  Prerequisites:  BIO 101 and 103 and either BIO 203 or 301, or permission of instructor.
BIO 303 Human Pathology/Medical Terminology 4 This course encompasses a study of the mechanisms underlying disease processes and their treatments in the human body.  Causes of and clinical changes produced by diseases, as well as the body’s response will be discussed in detail.  Principles and methods of treatment will also be examined.  This course will focus on non-infectious diseases, since a study of pathogens and the diseases they cause takes place in other courses.  A study of medical terminology will comprise a large part of the laboratory portion of the course.  Prerequisites: BIO 101 and one of the following courses: BIO 103, BIO 204, BO 205, BIO 301, or permission of instructor.
BIO 304 Wetlands Ecosystems and Lab 4 This course explores the ecology and biodiversity of inland and coastal wetland communities.  Students will explore the biological and physical structure of major wetland types world-wide, with an emphasis being placed on the mid-Atlantic and Piedmont regions of the United States.  Lectures focus on an interdisciplinary approach to understanding community composition and environmental fragility.  Field experiences to mountain streams, piedmont lakes, eastern swamps, and coastal salt-marsh ecosystems will allow students an opportunity to conduct environmental monitoring, species identification, and to investigate ecological interactions.  Prerequisites: BIO 101 and BIO 102 or BIO 103 or permission of instructor.
BIO 309 Natural History of Virginia 4 A study of the plants and animals of Virginia and the surrounding regions. We will investigate the ecosystems, habitats, and biological diversity of Virginia, Western North Carolina, and West Virginia. This course is designed as a survey course to give the student insight into the natural richness of this region. Prerequisites: BIO 101 and permission of instructor.
BIO 311 Coastal Ecosystems  4 A study of coastal ecological communities of the mid-Atlantic region of North America. We will investigate ecosystems, habitats, and biological diversity from the northern-most regions of North America to its southern most extent. Particular emphasis will be given to the mid-Atlantic region and the National seashores that have been designated as national treasures.  This course is designed as a survey course to give the student insight into the natural richness of this region. Students will learn field sampling techniques, construct predictive models, and analyze case studies to obtain a greater sense of the complexities of these ever changing regions. Prerequisites: BIO 101, BIO 330, or permission of instructor. BIO 330 may be taken as a co-requisite.
BIO 313 Pharmacology  4 This course introduces the basic concepts of pharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacotherapeutics. The process of clinical calculations is introduced, as well as the major drug classifications. Students will additionally practice application of knowledge to patients.  Drugs by body system and disease will be explored. Prerequisites: BIO 101; BIO 204, 205; CH 103 or CH 101 & 102; MTH 103 or permission of instructor.
BIO 314 Environmental Sustainability 4 A study of the interrelationships toward a sustainable future. Learn to be better decision makers in the allocation and conservation of natural resources. Learn from the past, monitor the present, and make better decisions to affect positive change for the future. Prerequisites: BIO 101, BIO 330, or permission of instructor.
BIO 330 General Ecology and Lab 4 A study of the interrelationships between plant and animal communities and their environment.  Lab included.  Prerequisites:  BIO 101, 102, and 103, or permission of instructor.
BIO 342 Environmental Policy and Law (Same as POS 342) 3 A survey of environmental laws and regulations in the United States:  who makes the laws and why, and who enforces the laws and how.  Consideration will be given to the experience of other countries and to alternative paradigms of environmental protection.
BIO 360 Cellular and Molecular Biology and Lab 4 The study of biological processes of the cell.  Cell structure and basic housekeeping processes that all cells perform will be studied, as well as cell signaling and selected specialized cellular processes.  Differences between the prokaryotic and the eukaryotic cell will be emphasized.  Molecular biological techniques will be emphasized in the laboratory portion of the course. Prerequisites:  BIO 101, 103, 203, CH 101 and 102, or permission of instructor.
BIO 400 Field Experience in Biological and Physical Sciences 1-4 An opportunity for students to gain practical experience in some area of biological or physical sciences.  These may include (but are not limited to) medical, environmental, research or clinical lab settings.  Students will take an active role in obtaining the internship.  The project and details must be approved as appropriate by departmental faculty.  The course will carry between 1 and 4 credits (to be determined by the department), depending on the nature and requirements of the project.  Prerequisites: Biological and physical science majors with at least 75 semester hours credit and at least a 2.5 GPA.  Depending on the site and nature of the project, there may be other requirements that the student must meet. Permission of instructor required.
BIO 425 Field Experience in Environmenal Studies 1 A field experience in which students, during their senior year, work with various government agencies and private enterprises by investigating, documenting, and writing research paper(s) pertaining to the environmental problems.  They will also attend and conduct seminars.  Prerequisite: BIO majors with senior status.
BIO 461 Topics in Biomedical Science 3 A seminar course that will address problems, controversial issues, ethical questions, and the process and future of medical care and research in the world.  Readings, oral, written and video presentations, and class discussions will comprise the format of this course.  This course will meet University writing, oral and technology competencies.  Prerequisite:  Senior Biology majors or permission of instructor.
BIO 462 Topics in Environmental Biology 3 A seminar course that will examine the scientific, historical, ethical , political, and economic dimensions of the environment.  Readings, oral, written and video presentations, and class discussions will comprise the format of this course.  This course will meet University writing, oral and technology competencies.  Prerequisite:  Junior or Senior Biology majors or permission of instructor.
BIO 465 Biological Research TBA The objective of this course is to provide students with an introduction to biological research.  The research will either be directed by a faculty member or as an arranged internship/co-op with academic labs, industry, biological field stations, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, etc.  Prerequisites:  Permission of faculty member and completion of junior year.
CH 101, 102 General Chemistry and Lab I, II 4,4 A study of the fundamental laws and concepts of chemistry with emphasis on modern atomic theory, solution and equilibrium principles, descriptive chemistry, and how these concepts relate to everyday phenomena.  Laboratory experiences based on these topics will be conducted.  Prerequisite or corequisite: MTH 103 or higher.
CH 103  Chemistry for the Life Sciences 4 This course introduces the fundamental concepts of general, organic, and biochemistry with an emphasis on their applications to the life sciences. Topics include measurements, matter and energy, atomic and molecular structure, chemical formulas and reactions, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, gas laws, solutions, acids and bases, saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, organic compounds containing oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen, carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and proteins, and nuclei acids. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of chemistry as it applies to life and health-related sciences.
CH 206 Biological Chemistry and Lab 4 An introduction to organic and biochemistry for environmental sciences.  Lectures and laboratory experiments dealing with the simple organic to the complex biomolecules of living systems; their properties, synthesis, and reactions.  The factors that control chemical processes are related to material conversion and energy extraction and are modified by environmental changes.   The influence of environmental factors will be emphasized.  Prerequisites:  CH 101, 102, or permission of instructor.  Alternate years or on demand.
CH 305 Organic Chemistry and Lab I 4 A study of organic chemistry from the functional group concept.  Each functional group will be studied from the aspect of reactions, synthesis, nomenclature, biological impact, and usefulness to people.  This course will be concerned primarily with the chemistry of bonding.  Prerequisites:  CH 101, 102, or permission of instructor.
CH 306 Organic Chemistry and Lab II 4

A study of the remaining organic functional groups (alcohols, ethers, acids, etc.).  Special topics such as drugs will be covered.  Prerequisites:  CH 101, 102, 305, or permission of instructor 

CH 330 Environmental Chemistry and Lab 4 A study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects and fates of chemical species in water, soil and air.  A variety of techniques are used to illustrate these factors in lecture and laboratory, including sampling, analysis, computer modeling, bioassay and development of an environmental impact study.  Prerequisites:  CH 101, 102, 206, BIO 101, and BIO 102 or 103, or permission of instructor.  Alternate years or on demand.
CH 401 Biochemistry and Lab 4 A study of the relationship between biology and organic chemistry.  Topics include biomolecules (synthesis, structure, and function), intermediary metabolism, and the function of cell components.  Laboratory work will accompany lectures.  Prerequisites:  CH 101, 102, 305, 306, BIO 101, 103, or permission of instructor.  Alternate years or on demand.
MT 400 Clinical Experience 0 An opportunity for clinical experience in a hospital laboratory.  Students who are enrolled at an approved hospital laboratory must register for this course in the fall semester of their senior year.  The purpose of this registration is to assure communication with the student.  No credit is awarded nor is any tuition charged.  There is a fee.
PSC 101 Survey of Physical Science and Lab 4 A course designed to acquaint students with objectives, content, materials, scientific methods, and logic.  Laboratory work oriented toward the development of practical science units and experiments.
PSC 201, 202 General College Physics and Lab I, II 4,4

A course which includes laboratory applications dealing with the concepts of mechanics, electricity, wave motion, sound, optics, and heat.  Also includes a brief introduction to modern physics in areas of electronic processes, atomic theory, solid state, super-conductivity, and biophysics.  Prerequisites:  MTH 103, MTH 104, or permission of instructor.