Courses of Instruction in Equestrian Studies

NOTE:  Students auditing riding classes will not participate as riders or be assigned a horse.

Number Title Credits Description
102 Novice Riding (Same as PE 103) 2 A laboratory course designed for non-equestrian studies majors.  The basic equestrian skills necessary for the student to prepare and ride the horse in a disciplined, safe and harmonious manner at walk and trot are stressed.  The class is strongly assisted by equestrian studies student teachers.
105 Practical Concepts of Equine Care 2 A practicum course designed to help students gain practical knowledge and skills required in the care and handling of the horse.  Participation in Averett stable procedures and routines is an integral part of this experience.
106 Horsemastership I 2 Freshman Placement Course: As a prelude to all good riding, riders must have a balanced and independent seat.  Although the seat takes continual dedicated effort from a self-motivated student, this class sets the foundation.  Students study equitation and develop feel at all three gaits through lunge lessons given by professors and/or student teachers.  Seat lessons include exercises without reins and stirrups at all gaits.  Some cavaletti, ground care, and off-lunge training is included.  Strength and suppleness of rider will be addressed.  May be repeated for up to 4 credits for each different activity selected.
107 Horsemastership II 2 Freshman Placement Course: Students study the aids used to effectively balance and supple the horses.  They will learn correct driving aids to energize the horse forward into an elastic, educated, and influential connection – includes training level concepts, cavaletti, and ground care.  Prerequisite: Confidence at all gaits without stirrups.  May be repeated for up to 4 credits for each different activity selected.
108 Horsemastership III 2 Freshman Placement Course:  Students study training level dressage, cavaletti, and jumping.  Students will effectively energize, balance, and supple horses into an elastic and influential connection “on the bit.”  Ground care is included.  This class will help prepare students for Horsemastership IV.  This class is required for the Management Track.  Prerequisite: Confidence at all gaits without stirrups and some experience putting horses “on the bit.”  May be repeated for up to 4 credits for each different activity selected. 
109 Horsemastership IV 2 This is the most advanced in the series of freshman placement courses.  This course is for students who have already enjoyed success at training level dressage and beginning jumping.  The students will be introduced to the Training Scale purpose, progression, and application.  Students study effectiveness of aids and position necessary to influence the quality of movement of the horse through 1st level dressage, cavaletti, and jumping.  Ground care and ground training are included.  This class is required for the Dressage and Eventing Tracks.  Prerequisite: Success at training level dressage and beginning jumping.  May be repeated for up to 4 credits for each different activity selected. Prerequisite: ES 108.
111 Equine Careers: Integrating Personal Goals 1 Students will develop a career plan based on increased self-awareness, personality traits, values, interests and goals, and research conducted on equine employment opportunities.  In addition, students will learn to prioritize and align the information gleaned with their future plans for a career in some aspect of the equine industry.
115 Stable Management 3 A course designed to teach the student various skills needed by a stable manager.  Topics include but are not limited to facility design, pasture management, and record keeping.  Skills learned will include but not be limited to various restraint methods, braiding, wraps, injections, trimming and clipping.  Prerequisite:  ES 105.
204 Equine Breeding and Reproduction 2 This course will help the student understand the basic reproductive anatomy and physiology of the mare and stallion and be able to apply this knowledge to the practical management of the breeding stallion and broodmare. Care and management of the pregnant mare, including foaling procedures, and neonatal and postnatal care of mare and foal will be covered. Students will be presented with the techniques of assisted equine reproduction, including artificial insemination, semen preservation and shipment, and embryo transfer. Lab and Lecture. Prerequisites: ES 208
205 Principles of Competition 2 This course is designed to help the student prepare a horse for competition at any level. Students will learn the mounted and management skills necessary to prepare and maintain a horse in competition condition. Students will gain actual competition experience through regional competitions. Focus will also be on improving riders’ position, coordination of the aides, and riding theory.  Prerequisites: ES 109
206 Rider Fitness 1 This course will study the leading exercise/training plans for equestrian athletes. Students will research and help design their own training plans based on those held by experts in the field. Students will meet for lab and lecture periods in addition to training time on their own. Can be repeated for up to 6 credits.
208 Equine Anatomy and Physiology 4 A lecture and laboratory course to study the basic concepts of equine anatomy and physiology.  A limited comparison with some of the other domesticated, large animals will be included.
211 Lunge Theory and Applications 1

The students learn correct, effective lunging technique as determined by the USDF.  Students learn to assess a variety of horses' strengths and weaknesses  according to the training scale and design an appropriate course for improvement.  Students gain introductory experience in lunging the rider. Students will establish a professional demeanor and a rapport of compassion and encouragement with an emphasis on safety. Prerequisite:  ES 108 or 109.

213 Dressage Through First Level 3

A dressage course designed to introduce the rider to the processes of preparing  and competing a specific horse at First level.  Riders will compete, participate in clinics and workshops, and volunteer at shows to gain competition management skills.  Through hands on and lecture periods, students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to produce a horse that is going freely forward in his gaits, and accepting the aids in an appropriate frame for first level.  Students will learn to assess training and design corrective exercises following the USDF guidelines. Horse care and proper fitness will be stressed.  Prerequisite:  ES 109.

214 Fundamentals of Eventing 2 A course designed to introduce the student to the skills and knowledge required to compete in the sport of Eventing.  The aim of the instruction will be to develop in the rider a correct, balanced, supple, and effective seat for jumping and dressage.  Riders will learn the correct use of aids for the exercises appropriate to the level, focusing upon the progressive development of horse and rider leading to greater confidence between them.  Many aspects of the sport will be discussed, such as tack selection, horse health, and rules for event competitions.  Prerequisite: ES 109.
215 Introduction to Equine Assisted Therapy 3 An interdisciplinary overview of the introductory principles of Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy (EAP) as a therapeutic tool to address behavioral, emotional, and relational issues within the individual, family, and/or group counseling sessions. Pre-requisites: none
216 Principles of Equine Behavior 3 An introduction to the behaviors of horses in the wild and in domestication. Through lecture and field observations students will learn to recognize how equines communicate through their behaviors and body language with an emphasis on how recognizing these behaviors can be used in EAP sessions.
Pre-requisites: none
224 Teaching Elementary Riding 3 A course designed to teach organization, preparation, control, and presentation of a riding lesson.  Application will involve actual teaching of beginning riding students under supervision.  Prerequisites:  ES 109 and ES 211.
260 Training Young Stock 2 An elective course designed to introduce the student to the training of young horses by actually handling foals, yearlings, and two-year olds.  Subjects include halter-breaking, lungeing, driving, mounting for the first time, and basic directional control.  Physical conditioning of the student will also be stressed.  Prerequisites: ES109.
301 Equine Assisted Psychotherapy Practicum I 4 This combination of lecture and laboratory provides the student an opportunity to begin performing EAP work in a peer setting. Students will role play EAP sessions and participate in an Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association (EAGALA) training session to prepare for certification.
Pre-requisites: ES 215 and ES 216 .
304 Advanced Stable Management 3 This course is designed to provide the student who has already been exposed to basic stable management with advanced lecture and laboratory experience. This course will focus on personnel management, stable routine, pasture management, emergency preparedness, and topics of special interest to today’s managers.
Prerequisites: ES 115.  ES 420 and ES 326 recommended.
305 Equine Assisted Psychotherapy Practicum II 6 This combination of lecture and laboratory provides students with an opportunity to begin performing EAP work with outside populations. Students will be supervised in their work with clients in a 10 week treatment module. Emphasis will be placed on treatment planning, case notes and research. Students will also participate in an EAGALA training session to prepare for certification.
Pre-requisites: ES 301.
313 Dressage Through Second Level 3

A dressage course designed to introduce the rider to the processes of preparing  and competing a specific horse at Second level.  Riders will compete, participate in clinics and workshops, and volunteer at shows to gain competition management skills.  Through hands on and lecture periods, students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to produce a horse that is going freely forward in his gaits, and accepting the aids in an appropriate frame for second level.  Students will learn to assess training and design corrective exercises following the USDF guidelines. Horse care and proper fitness will be stressed.  Prerequisite:  ES 213.

316 Training the Event Horse I 3

An eventing course designed to introduce the rider to the processes of preparing  and competing a specific horse at an appropriate level.  Riders will compete, participate in clinics and workshops, and volunteer at shows to gain competition management skills.  Through hands on and lecture periods, students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to produce a horse that is going freely forward in his gaits, and accepting the aids in an appropriate frame for the level.  The rider will also practice safe and appropriate schooling exercises for jumping and cross-country riding.  Horse care and proper fitness will be stressed.  Prerequisite:  ES 214.

323 Advancing the Dressage Horse 2 The students assess a variety of horses and design plans for training improvement based on classical theory from The German Training Scale.  Introductory through 2nd level exercises will be studied.  Students may participate in workshops or clinics that may fall on weekend days.  The students learn the format used in USDF instructor’s certification.  Prerequisite:  ES 313.
326 Equine Lameness and Disease 4 A course designed to acquaint the student with common equine lamenesses and diseases.  Causes, symptoms, and treatments of various diseases will be discussed.  The student will become familiar with the etiology of numerous lamenesses, as well as the prognosis and treatment of these conditions.  Special attention will be paid to the treatment of lameness issues in the performance horse.  Prerequisite:  ES 208.
330 Riding Instruction Programs 3 A course designed to improve the teaching skills of riding instructors and to help prepare them for a career in the horse industry.  Lecture topics such things as lateral movements and jumping, impromptu lessons, and the organization of shows and clinics.  Application will involve actual teaching of students under supervision.  Prerequisite:  ES 224.
401 Strategies for Equine Business Management 3 This course will be the culmination of applications for problem-solving and decision-making across the functional areas of all business-related issues surrounding Equestrian Studies and Business Administration.  Case studies and simulations specific to Equine Management issues are used to explore the sources and varieties of complex problems confronting contemporary businesses.  The focus of this course is on the management of equine businesses – large and small.  This is a capstone class and only will be offered to seniors.  Prerequisites: Senior status and BSA 206.
416 Training the Event Horse II 3

An eventing course designed to help the rider develop a horse that is more balanced in transitions, more responsive to lateral aids, and more connected between leg and hand.  Instruction will focus on exercises requiring varying degrees of the application of aids and the coordinated timing of the aids, helping the rider develop a feel for training.  Horse and rider strength and athleticism will be increased by progressive endurance and jumping exercises.  Riders will compete in competitions during the semester at the Novice level or above, as well as participate in clinics and workshops, and work at shows to gain competition management skills, throughout the semester.   Prerequisite: ES 316.

418 Instructor Certification Programs 3 A study of the standards for certification of dressage, eventing, hunt seat, and/or stable management. Topics will include dressage and jumping instructional standards, teaching theory and practice, and horse and stable management.  Students will attend  USEA, USDF, or ARIA instructor workshops during the semester.  Students may also prepare for and attempt ARIA instructor’s exam.  Prerequisites: ES 224, ES 213 or ES 214, ES 330 recommended.
420 Equine Nutrition 3 A course designed to help the student understand the basic principles of feeding horses.  Topics include anatomy of the digestive tract of the horse as it affects feeding practices, nutrient requirements for maintenance, work, pregnancy, and lactation in the horse.  Recent advances in equine nutrition will be discussed.  Prerequisite:  ES 208.
423 Instructor’s Apprentice I 2 The students gain practical knowledge and evaluative skills needed to be able to formulate appropriate advice for students schooling at 1st level dressage or baby novice eventing.  They learn to give advice that is organized, creative and flexible using correct terminology, and demonstrating compassion, rapport and encouragement.  They apply skills in private and group lesson formats. Prerequisites: ES 224 and ES 109, completion of 213 or 214 suggested.
470 Internship 3-6

A required course designed to help the student gain practical work experience and develop industry contacts.  Prerequisite:  ES 111 and a 2.0 cumulative grade point average.