Courses of Instruction

Number Title Credits Description
ART 103 The Visual Arts (5 weeks-3 credits) An introduction to images and structures created by mankind, investigations into how the eye sees, what is visually stimulating, materials and approaches used in art, and the cultural concepts found in the creation and appreciation of works of art.
ART 206 Art History (5 weeks-3 credits) A survey of paintings, sculptures, and architecture in a historical dimension from ancient times through the twentieth century.  Study focuses on an intellectual and practical approach for the student to examine art objects and know how they relate to the culture from which they came. Visits to art facilities and museums may be part of this course.
BIO 104 Human Ecology (7 weeks-4 credits) An introduction to the terminology, methodology, and worldview of biological science and the principles of ecology through a consideration of the impact of modern technology on the environment.  Human Ecology is a biology course primarily for the nonscientist.
BIO 204 Human Anatomy and Physiology (7 weeks-4 credits) An introduction to the terminology, anatomy, and physiology of the human body as it applies to everyday life.  Human Anatomy and Physiology is a biology course designed primarily for the non-major.
BSA 110 Introduction to Economics (5 weeks-3 credits) An overview of economics, emphasizing macroeconomics and concentrating on economic theories and tools that have practical application for the participant.
BSA 205 Business Management (5 weeks-3 credits) This course provides a basic introduction to business management.  Specifically, this course prepares a student to understand the basic functions of management, management planning, individual and group behavior in organizations, the environment of management and first line management and supervision techniques.
BSA 210 Introduction to Marketing (5 weeks-3 credits) A survey of the functional roles of marketing in a small business.  Marketing principles as applied to small business operations and larger company entry-level positions are major topics in this course.
BSA 220 Applied Financial Principles (6 weeks-3 credits) This course is an introduction to financial concepts in business.  Topics include securities markets, financial analysis and cash flow, time value of money, risk analysis, cost of capital, and the basics of security valuation. The course provides a foundation for further study at the Baccalaureate level.(Prerequisite: BSA 221)
BSA 221 Introduction to Accounting (6 weeks-3 credits) A study of basic accounting theories and procedures for dealing with activities of sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations.
BSA 260 Business Case Study (5 weeks-3 credits) A study in the uses of the case study and analysis method and integrating knowledge from previous courses to actual small business situations.  Analysis of various companies and business situations will increase analytical skills and expose students to managerial experiences.  Written and oral business communication skills will be emphasized.
CSS 110 Computer and Information Processing (5 weeks-3 credits) An introduction to the role of computers in today’s business environment.  It covers the fundamentals of computer systems with a focus on end-user applications.
ENG 111 Introduction to Writing and Research (5 weeks-3 credits) A review of usage, punctuation, and paragraph development. Emphasis on effective written communication, especially in short (1-3 page) essays.  Includes some critical study of prose fiction. Frequent in-class and out-of-class writing practice.  Instruction in using the library for research and in various stages of assembling research material.  Averett University does not accept a grade of “D” or below for ENG 111.
ENG 112 Introduction to Literature (5 weeks-3 credits) The reading of fiction, poetry, and drama, both classic and contemporary.  Emphasis on genre study, literary terminology, and critical analysis.  Includes further practice in use of research materials and preparation of a term paper on a literary topic.  Students must pass with a grade of “C” or better. Averett University does not accept a grade of “D” or below for ENG 112. (Prerequisite: ENG 111)
ENG 220 World Literature (5 weeks-3 credits) A survey of major writers (excluding British and American) of the Western World from the ancient Greeks to the beginnings of the twentieth century.  Students will also be familiarized with the literary and cultural backgrounds of the works in question.  (Prerequisite: ENG 111, 112) 
HIS 101 Western Civilization I (5 weeks-3 credits) A survey of world history from the earliest times to 1715 emphasizing western civilization and the relevance of the past to contemporary life.
HIS 102 Western Civilization II (5 weeks-3 credits) A survey of world history from 1715 to the present emphasizing western civilization and the relevance of the past to contemporary life.
IDS 102 Social Issues (5 weeks-3 credits) A study of contemporary social problems of poverty, war, racism, sexism, domestic violence, and resource depletion.  Theories of causation, cost, and possible solutions are discussed.
IDS 205 Leadership and Management of Conflict (5 weeks-3 credits) This course will enable students in the GPS program to increase their skills and understanding of conflict management.  This course is especially designed to help the student formulate a clearer understanding of group dynamics and behavior in the workplace.  The experiences in this course will contribute to the development of interpersonal skills for handling conflict with individuals and groups within an organization.
IDS 301 Principles of Adult Learning (3 weeks-1 credit) This seminar is the foundation for adults enrolled in the Graduate & Professional Studies Program (GPS) at Averett University.  It must be taken prior to enrollment in any undergraduate or graduate degree program.  It is designed to help new and returning students make the transition to the academic setting at the university level.  This seminar stresses critical reading, active discussion, and reflective writing.  Readings are drawn from the fields of education, philosophy, literature, psychology, and the social and natural sciences.
LDR 104 Leadership (5 weeks-3 credits) This course is an introduction of the study of leadership within an organization.  Students will review and analyze past and current theories of leadership with a focus on the application of leadership principles to the workplace.
MTH 100 Fundamentals of Mathematics (6 weeks-3 credits) A course designed to review and develop mathematical skills needed for college algebra.  Topics include properties of the real number system, graphing, word problems, and selected topics in beginning algebra.  Credits are not computed in the grade point average and are not counted toward the 120 semester hour graduation requirement.
MTH 103 Principles of Mathematics (6 weeks-3 credits) A first course in college mathematics, focusing on functions and their applications.  Topics include equations, graphing, relations, and functions with an emphasis on polynomial, logarithmic, and exponential functions.  (Prerequisite:  MTH 100 or placement)
MUS 103 Introduction to Music Literature (5 weeks-3 credits) A general survey of the history of Western music from the Middle Ages to the present.  Emphasis will be upon important composers and musical styles with attention given to the development of skills in listening to music. 
PE 205 Lifetime Fitness (5 weeks-3 credits)

A course designed to provide the student with the capability to apply scientific principles to maximize one’s own fitness needs and to develop ways to maintain fitness throughout one’s life.  Each student will develop his/her own exercise program.  This course provides both cognitive and physical experience.

PHL 210 Ethics (6 weeks-3 credits) An examination of representative theories of morality from historical and contemporary sources.  An interactive course designed to encourage critical thinking about current ethical and moral issues within our society.  Questions of value, good, right, and obligation are included.
PSC 103 Astronomy (7 weeks-4 credits) An introduction to the current state of astronomy, both the fundamentals of astronomical knowledge and the advances.  The subjects of discussion include a grand tour of the heavens, light, matter and energy, telescope, gravity and motion, stars, black holes, the Milky Way, and galaxies.
AV 115 Weather and Climate (7 weeks-4 credits) A study of basic concepts and processes of atmospheric phenomena.  The earth’s atmospheric composition, wind, pressure, temperature, moisture, clouds, air masses, fronts, thunderstorms, icing, fog, and jet streams are included.  Weather data studied include constant pressure maps, surface weather observations, surface maps, and other related weather reports.
PSY 218 Applied Psychology (5 weeks-3 credits) A survey of the application of psychology to many areas of personal and professional life.
REL 101 Introduction to Old Testament Literature (5 weeks-3 credits) The application of critical methodology to the history, literature, and religion of the ancient Hebrews.  Attention is given to the historical context, the development, and the message of the Hebrew faith.
REL 102 Introduction to New Testament Literature (5 weeks-3 credits) The application of critical methodology is applied to the biblical text to discover the basic meaning and message of the New Testament.  Attention is given to the secular and religious history of the period as well as to the life and teachings of Jesus, the letters of Paul, and the origins of the Christian church.
REL 201 Religions of the World (5 weeks-3 credits)  An examination of the origin, basic beliefs, historical developments, and sociological manifestations of the world’s great religions.
TH 103 Introduction to Human Communication (5 weeks-3 credits) A study of communication forms and contexts, including interpersonal, intrapersonal, and public. Emphasis on development of individual communicative competency in such areas as listening, reasoning, interviewing, small group, and nonverbal communication.  (Completion of ENG 111 is
recommended as a prerequisite)
TH 104 Introduction to Public Speaking (5 weeks-3 credits) An introduction to the major types of public address.  The course will emphasize the development of competencies in public speaking through the composition and presentation of speeches covering the informative, persuasive, argumentative, and special occasion genres.
TH 220 History of the Theatre I (5 weeks-3 credits) The study of theatre development from its beginning to the Renaissance.
Associate of Science in Business Administration
IDS104 Introduction (5 weeks-3 credits) A survey of some foundations of higher education for adult students who may not have previous higher education experiences.  Emphasis is on managing goal achievement in the academic environment.  Topics include adult learning concepts, academic program planning, personal and professional growth, work behavioral styles, group dynamics, library resource utilization, and time management.
BSA104 Intro to Management Concepts (5 weeks-3 credits) The purpose of this course is to introduce undergraduate students to many of the business management concepts from the beginning of management thought and theories to the present.  This will be done by completing a series of individual and group papers analyzing different business concepts by using critical thinking skills.  This course is also designed to prepare students to write in the academic style required to complete the AS in Business or Bachelor of Business degrees. In addition to the primary focus on business management theory, this course will also emphasize the development of writing skills and critical thinking skills, guided by critical thinking and writing rubrics developed by the Graduate and Professional Studies Program faculty.
BSA 110 Introduction to Economics (5 weeks-3 credits) An overview of economics, emphasizing macroeconomics and concentrating on economic theories and tools that have practical application for the participant.
BSA 221 Introduction to Accounting (6 weeks-3 credits) A study of basic accounting theories and procedures for dealing with activities of sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations.
BSA 205 Business Management (5 weeks-3 credits) A study of individual and group behavior in organizations.  Topics include motivation, communications and other topics related to small business management. Planning and execution of first line management and supervision techniques will be highlighted in this course.
BSA 210 Introduction to Marketing (5 weeks-3 credits) A survey of the functional roles of marketing in a small business.  Marketing principles as applied to small business operations and larger company entry-level positions are major topics in this course.
BSA 220 Applied Financial Principles (6 weeks-3 credits) This course is an introduction to financial concepts in business.  Topics include securities markets, financial analysis and cash flow, time value of money, risk analysis, cost of capital, and the basics of security valuation. The course provides a foundation for further study at the Baccalaureate level.(Prerequisite: BSA 221)
BSA 260 Business Case Study (5 weeks-3 credits) A study in the uses of the case study and analysis method and integrating knowledge from previous courses to actual small business situations.  Analysis of various companies and business situations will increase analytical skills and expose students to managerial experiences.  Written and oral business communication skills will be emphasized.
LDR 103 Leadership (5 weeks-3 credits) A study of the concept of leadership within the context of business, education, politics and religion.  Students will review and apply current theories of leadership and analyze the leadership style and potential of themselves as well as others.

Bachelor of Business Administration

BSA 206 Business Communications (5 weeks-3 credits) This course is designed to improve written and oral communication skills within the context of the business environment.  Students will learn to prepare various business letters, reports, and other forms of written communication.  Decision-making and problem-solving techniques are emphasized through an introduction to case study methods.  Students are introduced to electronic presentation media and encouraged to use other technological means to communicate with the professor and with each other.
BSA 305 Principles of Management (5 weeks-3 credits) An introduction of the art and science of management concepts and principles necessary to accomplish managerial tasks.  The theory of management, the application of theory to managerial situations, and the basic principles of management are emphasized.
BSA 308 Business Statistics and Research (7 weeks-4 credits) This course includes a study of statistical techniques and research design appropriate for business. The course begins with a review of the mathematics necessary to understand the nature of statistical analysis.  Attention is given to data collection, analysis of data using basic statistical tools (to include descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression) and interpretation of data.
BSA 310 Principles of Marketing (5 weeks-3 credits) A survey of the role of marketing in the organization.  Marketing strategies will be examined through discussion of product, price, distribution and promotion concepts.  The marketing environment and its impact on consumers will also be examined.
BSA 221 Introduction to Accounting (6 weeks-3 credits) A study of basic accounting theories and procedures for dealing with activities of sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations.
BSA 346 Accounting for Managers (6 weeks-3 credits) A study of accounting principles applied to decision making at the operations level of management.  Practices in cost accounting, budgeting, funding, and accounting controls will be emphasized in this course.  (Prerequisite: BSA 221)
BSA 326 Organizational Behavior, Theory and Leadership (5 weeks-3 credits) A study of how people operate in organizations, how the structure of the organization can affect their performance and the key elements to organizational leadership.  Case studies illustrating concepts regarding human behavior and development in individual, group and complex organizational settings will be used. 
BSA 409 Business and Corporate Finance (7 weeks-4 credits) This course provides a basic knowledge of the finance discipline, including the different ways that businesses can be formed, the types of financial markets available, and how capital investments and funding decisions are determined in a way to maximize a firm’s value. Topics include a review of the time value of money, valuation techniques such as net present value and internal rate of return, financial ratio analysis, and management of current assets and liabilities.  The cost of capital concepts is reviewed.  (Prerequisites: BSA 308, 346)
BSA 354 Human Resource Management (5 weeks-3 credits) A study of employer-employee relationships in business and industry, including personnel policies and methods, selection, placement, training and promotion of employees and recent trends in employment practices.
BSA 480 International Business (5 weeks-3 credits) An introduction to the strategic and functional aspects of international business.  Students are challenged to apply and integrate basic business knowledge and skills to global finance, marketing, operations, trade, and the management of new ventures and alliances in dynamic international environments.  Students will explore the impact of environmental challenges, including economic factors, sociological-cultural factors, legal-political factors, and the use of various tools and techniques developed to meet these challenges.
BSA 444 Management Strategy (6 weeks-3 credits) This is a capstone course that will focus on the formulation and implementation of strategies that result in a sustainable competitive advantage for the organization.  Business problem-solving and decision-making techniques applicable across the functional areas of business will be introduced. Case studies and business simulations are used to explore the complex problems confronting contemporary business and to find and successfully implement solutions to these problems.  Prerequisite: Completion of all major courses.  Exceptions may be granted by Regional Director and Instructor.
BSA 407 Integration Project (Independent study-3 credits) A course designed to integrate and demonstrate the student’s professional and personal growth during his/her third and fourth year of baccalaureate study.  The student will document one major assignment from each course that demonstrates the various levels of cognitive learning, i.e. knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation.  With this historical foundation, the student will prepare a faculty-guided major written project encompassing an area of theory and practical application in the field of business, developed over the duration of the BSA program of study, which demonstrates the student‘s knowledge of applied business research.
ECO 306 Economics for Managers (7 weeks-4 credits) A study of the basic principles of economics and how economic thought historically has impacted business and industry.  Domestic as well as global economic issues are emphasized. (Prerequisite: BSA 308)
PHL 300 Applied Ethics (5 weeks-3 credits) An examination of representative theories of morality from historical and contemporary sources. The student will look at the moral issues that affect employers and employees in the work environment.

Bachelor of Science in Sociology/Criminal Justice

SOC 101 Intro to Sociology (5 weeks-3 credits) A scientific study of social behavior examining the topics of culture, socialization, social organization, social class, minority groups, social power and conflict, patterns of social interaction, the environment and social change.
SOC 216 Criminology (5 weeks-3 credits) An examination of criminal behavior and crimes against society.  The crimes surveyed include murder, burglary, robbery, fraud, embezzlement, confidence games, and business crimes.  The course provides an analysis of the social and legal factors affecting the nature of crime and the development of social responses to it.
SOC 317 American Minorities (5 weeks-3 credits) An examination of the conditions and problems of minority groups with particular emphasis on the social and psychological processes involved in prejudice.  The focus is on racial, ethnic, class, and religious minorities, but consideration is given to women, the elderly, homosexuals, and the mentally and physically disabled as minority groups.  (Prerequisite: SOC 101)
SOC 470 Research Methods (5 weeks-3 credits) An examination of the methods sociologists use in gathering and evaluating scientific facts.  Topics include surveys, participant observation, content analysis, questionnaire construction, and interviewing.  (Prerequisites:  SOC 101 and 6 hrs. of Sociology)
SOC 309 Society and the Individual (5 weeks-3 credits) An examination of the individual in a changing society and the dynamic relationship between the person and society at large.  Particular attention is paid to the topics of personality development, perception, symbolic communication, drug addiction, madness, social control, and deviant subcultures.  Several theoretical perspectives are employed to analyze these topics.
CRJ 301 Criminal Justice (5 weeks-3 credits) An overview of the criminal justice system in the United States.  Emphasis is placed on the profession of police officer and the problems encountered in crime scene analysis, police discretion, and relationships with the larger society.  The workings of the courts are examined with reference to the roles of the attorneys, judges, and defendants.  The basic problems of the prison system and possible alternatives are explored.  (Prerequisites: Sophomore status or above)
CRJ 304 Police in America (5 weeks-3 credits) A course that examines the role of the police in American society.  Topics include the history of the police, development of different police agencies, police discretion, police administration, police organizations, deadly force, and community policing.
CRJ 329 Drugs and Substance Abuse (5 weeks-3 credits) An examination of drugs and substance abuse in American society.  The student will examine the social, physical, and mental effects that drugs have on the user, as well as the impact they have on the family and society.  Major issues include addiction, recovery, treatment, rehabilitation, and relapse prevention.
CRJ 340 Juvenile Delinquency and Justice (5 weeks-3 credits) An examination of the causes of juvenile delinquency, sociological theory, and the responses of the legal system.  The extent of juvenile delinquency, the organization of police, judicial, and correctional response to juvenile offenders, the legal developments in statutory and case law, and the future of this system are examined.
CRJ 352 Criminal Investigation (5 weeks-3 credits) An overview of criminal investigation techniques with an emphasis on crime scene investigation and crime laboratory developments.  Recent developments in the field include DNA research, trace physical evidence, fingerprint developments, and specific crime analysis techniques.  (Prerequisites: Sophomore status or above)
CRJ 375 Corrections (5 weeks-3 credits) A survey of prisons, jails, and correction alternatives in the United States.  Topics include federal, state, and local correctional facilities, sentencing, the prison experience, community correctional programs, probation and parole. (Prerequisite: SOC 101)
CRJ 387 Criminal Law (5 weeks-3 credits) An examination of the elements of criminal laws and the defenses associated with them.  Specific crimes of murder, burglary, robbery, rape, traffic offenses, larceny, embezzlement, arson, and other crimes are discussed.  Basic criminal procedure questions of search and seizure are examined.  The new changes and trends in criminal law are discussed.
CRJ 407 Courts and Trials (5 weeks-3 credits) A detailed examination of the courtroom procedures and the roles and responsibilities of the judge, the prosecutor, defendant, and police officer.  Topics discussed include the structure of the courts, the steps in prosecution, the trial, and sentencing.  (Prerequisite: Sophomore status or above)
CRJ 488 Criminal Procedure (5 weeks-3 credits) A course that examines the main criminal procedure law and search and seizure issues in modern criminal justice.  The major procedures and laws that relate to upholding the criminal justice system, including the U.S. Constitution and federal and state legislation are examined.  Court cases and legal analysis are applied to the reading of appellate court decisions.

Executive Master of Business Administration

BSA 535 Legal Aspects (6 weeks-3 credits) A review of the legal and ethical issues directly affecting practicing managers in the organizational structures, regulatory environments, and societal expectations encountered today.  Beginning with a review of the American Legal System, and a framework for ethical decision making, the course focuses on the major areas of management where management decision making and commercial activities are proscribed by the expectations and regulations of society.
BSA 504 Contemporary Issues of Human Resource Management (6 weeks-3 credits) This course is a study of the contemporary issues facing managers.  While the course will draw heavily on the field of human resource management, it is meant not just for HRM practitioners but also for managers and future managers in their dealings with their human resources.  Although, presuming students have a fundamental awareness of the field, it will provide sufficient reading material for those who do not.  It is designed as a readings course, interspersed with cases and experiential exercises designed to promote understanding.  In addition to assigned readings, students are asked to regularly report on outside readings from the business press that support or amplify concepts and issues discussed in class.  As a contemporary issues course, it is expected to evolve as the issues evolve.
BSA 529 Marketing Strategies (6 weeks-3 credits) A study of advanced marketing management, both domestically and internationally.  Product, price, promotion, and distribution concepts and issues will be analyzed through case studies and practical exercises.  The importance of quality and customer service will be stressed.  The global, legal, social, technical, economic, and competitive environments of marketing will also be studied.
BSA 518 Business Research Methods & Applications (10 weeks-4 credits) This course prepares students to understand, perform and interpret business research within an organizational setting.  The course will discuss the role of business research within a business enterprise, the various methodologies and processes used to analyze a research problem, and the application of scientific methods in business.  Specifically, students will learn about research problem definition, data types, sampling, data collection, observation, survey and experimental research and the applications of research design and statistical techniques (to include hypothesis testing, correlation, regression analysis, chi-square, and analysis of variance).  Students will discuss how managers apply the scientific method to business decision-making and how managers utilize the findings of research performed by others.  The course will culminate with a research project, which demonstrates the application of the scientific method to a real world, business-related issue.
BSA 523 Operations Management and Analysis (9 weeks-4 credits) This course will study both the quantitative techniques of operations research and decision science as well as the concepts and techniques related to the design, planning, control and improvement of manufacturing and service operations.  Analytical methods for solving management problems, construction of mathematical models and advanced quantitative decision techniques will be used for solving operational problems in manufacturing and service operations.  The focus of this course will be on the application and interpretation of these analytical techniques and solutions.   (Prerequisite:  BSA 518)
BSA 532 Organizational Behavior (6 weeks-3 credits) This course is a study of organizational behavior and its application to the understanding and development of an effective workforce.  The course examines individual behavior, group behavior, and finally the organization system.  Further, each workshop focuses special attention on the skills that managers demonstrate in developing positive relationships with—and motivating others—in the organization and in attaining personal success.  The course is concerned with both organizational and management theories as well as practice.  The workshops are geared to provide students with an opportunity to experience behaviors reminiscent of actual situations faced on the job.  These situational experiences are related to a series of readings and class discussions that summarize the relevant theory and provide practical skills and information.
BSA 522 Comprehensive Managerial Accounting (10 weeks-4 credits)

A course designed to integrate the general accounting principles of financial and managerial accounting techniques and uses of accounting from a management perspective with graduate level instruction.  Focus is on using accounting information to help the student develop an understanding of how certain accounting data are used in the management planning and control processes. Emphasis will be given to the preparation and analysis of financial accounting managerial reports, costing methods, standards and systems of planning and control.  The course design uses case studies integration so students can focus on how managers can better manage because of what accountants do, and how managers can use the accounting information system more effectively.

The course is concerned with both organizational and management theories as well as practice.  The workshops are geared to provide students with an opportunity to experience behaviors reminiscent of actual situations faced on the job.  These situational experiences are related to a series of readings and class discussions that summarize the relevant theory and provide practical skills and information.
BSA 538 Contemporary Issues in Leadership (6 weeks-3 credits) A critical review of current thinking with regard to the application of leadership and followership principles.  Current theories will be discussed with a focus on their relevance within an organizational setting.  Students will conduct relevant research that applies to their own workplace. The distinction between the concepts of leadership and management will be explored with an emphasis on leadership values, skills, and knowledge needed for success within everyday work settings.  During the course, student study teams will arrange for guest speakers who hold leadership roles within the community.
BSA 542 Advanced Managerial Economics (10 weeks-4 credits)

Managerial economics is the study of the synthesis of economic theory, decision sciences, and various fields of business administration studies.  Managerial economics examines how these disciplines interact as the domestic or international firm’s attempts to reach optimal managerial decisions.

This course examines how these disciplines interact.  This includes integration of economic theory and methodology with analytical tools for application to decision making about the efficient allocation of scarce resources in public and private institutions.  This course offers a rigorous treatment of economic theory and analysis with a focus on the techniques that make it useful for the decision-making process.  Examples, cases discussions, questions, problems, and articles are used to illustrate the application of theory to a variety of real-world decision situations.  Due to the increasing importance of international trade in the United States, illustrations and cases related to international concerns are covered in this course.  Graphical tools, mathematics and statistics, short case problems, and a microcomputer approach are introduced to assist the student in gaining greater insight regarding economic relationships when actually employing economic theories in the decision-making process. (Prerequisite:  BSA 518)

BSA 554 Comprehensive Financial Management (10 weeks-4 credits) The major focus of the course is how to determine the optimum cost of capital, the theoretical solution for maximizing stockholder wealth.  Key topics include interest rate structures in the economy, bond valuations, several ways of determining required rates of return for common stockholders, and preferred stock required rates of return.  This course includes a major study team project to determine the optimum cost of capital for a major corporation, with team presentations during the last class period.  Additional subject areas include lease versus buy decisions, and more advanced financial topics such as hybrids, options, convertible bonds/stocks, and mergers & acquisitions.  Social/ethical aspects of financial decisions are discussed. (Prerequisites:  BSA 518, 522)
BSA 545 International Business (6 weeks-3 credits) An introduction to the opportunities and constraints posed by the expanding business environment. Topics include, but are not limited to, the following: An overview of the global economy, a discussion of trading blocs, a review of legalities/trade regulations and cooperative working arrangements, financing and currency exchange, the significance of cultural/regional/political influences, and international trade theories and guiding principles.
BSA 555 Strategic Management (7 weeks-3 credits) An in-depth analysis and evaluation of the organization‘s corporate and business strategies.  As the capstone course in the MBA program, it requires the integration and synthesis of knowledge acquired in the program via application of acquired functional skills to strategic decision making. The emphasis is to engender within the Averett University MBA graduate a futurist perspective on comprehensive strategic decision-making.  Prerequisite:  Completion of all core courses. Exceptions may be granted by the Regional Director and the instructor.
Master of Business Administration - Human Resource Management Concentration
BSA 562 Compensation and Benefits Management (Online-3 credits) This course explores the development and use of various strategic choices in managing compensation and benefits in today’s highly competitive business environment.  Today, as never before, human resource professionals and executives must develop compensation systems that align strategically with the organization’s mission and vision, while facilitating the recruitment and retention of qualified and productive employees.  Major compensation issues are analyzed and discussed in the context of current research, theory and practice, covering both new and well-established approaches.  (Prerequisite:  BSA 504)
BSA 564 Recruitment and Selection (Online-3 credits) This course provides an overview of the processes and systems with which organizations staff positions with both internal and external applicants.  Because staffing is one of the primary human resource activities, it is critical for human resource professionals to understand how theory, research, and legal foundations can impact staffing decisions.  This course focuses on theories, research, policies, and practices concerning job recruitment and selection.  Topics include staffing strategy and context, measurement of staffing effectiveness, job/competency analysis, human resource planning, recruitment and job choice, and internal and external selection practices. 
(Prerequisite:  BSA 504)
BSA 563 Labor and Employment Law (Online-3 credits) This course provides an in-depth analysis of the laws governing labor relations and employees rights in the workplace.  The first half of the course examines the legal framework in which collective bargaining takes place, including union organizational campaigns, negotiations, and enforcement of collective bargaining agreements, including the use of economic pressure.  The second half surveys additional issues of rights in the employment relationship, including such topics as occupational safety and health, employment discrimination, pay equity, disability discrimination, contractual and tort theories in employment, and plant closings and unemployment issues.  (Prerequisite:  BSA 504)

Master of Business Administration - Human Resource Management Certificate

BSA 504 Contemporary Issues of Human Resource Management (6 weeks-3 credits) This course is a study of the contemporary issues facing managers. While the course will draw heavily on the field of human resource management, it is meant not just for HRM practitioners but also for managers and future managers in their dealings with their human resources. Although, presuming students have a fundamental awareness of the field, it will provide sufficient reading material for those who do not. It is designed as a readings course, interspersed with cases and experiential exercises designed to promote understanding. In addition to assigned readings, students are asked to regularly report on outside readings from the business press that support or amplify concepts and issues discussed in class. As a contemporary issues course, it is expected to evolve as the issues evolve.
BSA 532 Organizational Behavior (6 weeks-3 credits) This course is a study of organizational behavior and its application to the understanding and development of an effective workforce. The course examines individual behavior, group behavior, and finally the organization system. Further, each workshop focuses special attention on the skills that managers demonstrate in developing positive relationships with—and motivating others—in the organization and in attaining personal success. The course is concerned with both organizational and management theories as well as practice. The workshops are geared to provide students with an opportunity to experience behaviors reminiscent of actual situations faced on the job. These situational experiences are related to a series of readings and class discussions that summarize the relevant theory and provide practical skills and information.
BSA 562 Compensation and Benefits Management (6 weeks-3 credits) This course explores the development and use of various strategic choices in managing compensation and benefits in today’s highly competitive business environment. Today, as never before, human resource professionals and executives must develop compensation systems that align strategically with the organization’s mission and vision, while facilitating the recruitment and retention of qualified and productive employees. Major compensation issues are analyzed and discussed in the context of current research, theory and practice, covering both new and well established approaches. (Prerequisite: BSA 504)
BSA 563 Labor and Employment Law (6 weeks-3 credits) This course provides an in-depth analysis of the laws governing labor relations and employees rights in the workplace. The first half of the course examines the legal framework in which collective bargaining takes place, including union organizational campaigns, negotiations, and enforcement of collective bargaining agreements, including the use of economic pressure. The second half surveys additional issues of rights in the employment relationship, including such topics as occupational safety and health, employment discrimination, pay equity, disability discrimination, contractual and tort theories in employment, and plant closings and unemployment issues. (Prerequisite: BSA 504)
BSA 564 Recruitment and Selection (6 weeks-3 credits) This course provides an overview of the processes and systems with which organizations staff positions with both internal and external applicants. Because staffing is one of the primary human resource activities, it is critical for human resource professionals to understand how theory, research, and legal foundations can impact staffing decisions. This course focuses on theories, research, policies, and practices concerning job recruitment and selection. Topics include staffing strategy and context, measurement of staffing effectiveness, job/competency analysis, human resource planning, recruitment and job choice, and internal and external selection practices. (Prerequisite: BSA 504)

Master of Business Administration - Leadership Concentration

BSA 572 History, Theories, and Concepts (Online-3 credits) This class will ground the student in the theories and concepts of traditional leadership.  This course is the foundation for understanding leadership theories and concepts.  The purpose of this course is to provide the student with leadership and management concepts and theories that can be used to increase productivity, reduce disciplinary problems, provide strategic leadership, and lower employee turnover.  This course will introduce the student to leadership and management in the United States or other cultures.  Management and leadership will be clearly defined as different roles in the organization.  A unifying theory of leadership and management will be offered for the first time and is necessary for the student to understand concepts and theories in subsequent courses.  (Prerequisites: BSA 532, 538)
BSA 573 Cultural Leadership in a Global Economy (Online-3 credits) Using the unifying theory of leadership and management introduced in BSA 532 and BSA 538, the student will learn how differences in culture affect leading and managing in different cultures or with a culturally diverse workforce.  Research in comparing cultures pioneered by Geert Hofstede is the foundation for this course.  The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of management and leadership in other cultures and to suggest ways to manage and lead a workforce from different cultures or a culturally diverse workforce.  (Prerequisites: BSA 532, 538)
BSA 574 Leadership in Groups and Teams (Online-3 credits) This course will provide the student with a focused and practical approach to leading and managing small groups and teams.  There is an emphasis on conflict resolution, team building, disciplining and rewarding team members, developing a vision and working values, self-managed teams, and identifying and solving specific problems among team or group members.  This is a very practical course.  The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the specific skills and abilities necessary to resolve conflicts, develop team purpose, perform self analysis, and maintain team function.  (Prerequisites:  BSA 532, 538)
BSA 575 Integrative Capstone in Leadership and Management (Online-3 credits) This course will provide the student with the research skills necessary to complete the required research paper or project.  This includes problem identification, hypothesis development, and review of related literature, development of a research methodology, data collection, data analysis, development of recommendations, and the analysis of the success of the implementation of the recommendation.  To successfully complete this course, the student must be able to apply the knowledge and skills gained in the other leadership courses to a specific area of interest using graduate level research and/or program design and implementation.   This graduate-level research can be done on topics of interest to the student’s employer, another team to which the student belongs or on a topic of particular interest to the student.  This research project must have the approval of the professor and the student’s employer when applicable.

Master of Business Administration - Leadership Certificate

BSA 538 Contemporary Issues in Leadership (6 weeks-3 credits) A critical review of current thinking with regard to the application of leadership and followership principles. Current theories will be discussed with a focus on their relevance within an organizational setting. Students will conduct relevant research that applies to their own workplace. The distinction between the concepts of leadership and management will be explored with an emphasis on leadership values, skills, and knowledge needed for success within everyday work settings.
BSA 572 History, Theories, and Concepts (6 weeks-3 credits) This class will ground the student in the theories and concepts of traditional leadership. This course is the foundation for understanding leadership theories and concepts. The purpose of this course is to provide the student with leadership and management concepts and theories that can be used to increase productivity, reduce disciplinary problems, provide strategic leadership, and lower employee turnover. This course will introduce the student to leadership and management in the United States or other cultures. Management and leadership will be clearly defined as different roles in the organization. A unifying theory of leadership and management will be offered for the first time and is necessary for the student to understand concepts and theories in subsequent courses.
BSA 573 Cultural Leadership in a Global Economy (6 weeks-3 credits) Using the unifying theory of leadership and management introduced in BSA538, the student will learn how differences in culture affect leading and managing in different cultures or with a culturally diverse workforce.  Research in comparing cultures pioneered by Geert Hofstede is the foundation for this course. The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of management and leadership in other cultures and to suggest ways to manage and lead a workforce from different cultures or a culturally diverse workforce.
BSA 574 Leadership in Groups and Teams (6 weeks-3 credits) This course will provide the student with a focused and practical approach to leading and managing small groups and teams.  This course includes an emphasis on conflict resolution, team building, disciplining and rewarding team members, developing a vision and working values, self-managed teams, and identifying and solving specific problems among team or group members.  The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the specific skills and abilities necessary to resolve conflicts, develop team purpose, perform self-analysis, and maintain team function.
BSA 575 Integrative Capstone in Leadership and Management (6 weeks-3 credits) This course will provide the student with the research skills necessary to complete the required research paper or project.  This includes problem identification, hypothesis development, and review of related literature, development of a research methodology, data collection, data analysis, development of recommendations, and the analysis of the success of the implementation of the recommendation.  To successfully complete this course, the student must be able to apply the knowledge and skills gained in the other leadership courses to a specific area of interest using graduate level research and/or program design and implementation.   This graduate-level research can be done on topics of interest to the student’s employer, another team to which the student belongs or on a topic of particular interest to the student.  This research project must have the approval of the professor and the student’s employer when applicable.   

Master of Business Administration - Marketing Concentration

BSA 567 Marketing Research (Online-3 credits) This course provides an overview of the qualitative and quantitative information needs of marketing decision-making.  Emphasis is placed on designing effective research projects and the techniques used for collection and analysis of primary data.  Major topics include: design of research projects, survey research, observational research, questionnaire design, sampling, data collection, data analysis, and interpretation of findings.  (Prerequisites:  Earned a grade of "B" or above in both BSA 518 and an equivalent, BSA 529)
BSA 568 Marketing Response to Consumer Behavior (Online-3 credits) A study of the cognitive and behavioral processes underlying consumer’s decision-making practices and buying preferences.  The class addresses a variety of marketing decisions that can influence the process and generate desired buyer behavior and overall marketing objectives.  
(Prerequisite:  Earned a grade of "B" or above in BSA 529)
BSA 569 Product & Services Brand Management (Online-3 credits) The class covers the management of branded products and services. The class also covers corporate identity (e.g., government, non-profits, and individual entities that may lack defined branding).  The class deals with firms that manage multiple brands as well as entrepreneurial firms that rely upon a single product/service.  Key areas of investigation include brand equity, channel maximization, private-label branding, and the creative requirements for brand identification.  (Prerequisite:  Earned a grade of "B" or above in BSA 529)
BSA 570 Global Marketing Management (Online-3 credits) This course examines the major marketing issues and opportunities facing companies who market products and services outside their domestic borders.  Students will gain knowledge in the theories, strategies, and influences that drive marketing in foreign environments as well as the analytical tools required in practicing global marketing strategies.  The course will concentrate on strategic decisions companies make about the 4P’s (product, price, place and promotion) in international markets.  Students will acquire knowledge on global marketing environment, development of competitive strategy, global marketing strategy development, and managing global operations.  (Prerequisite:  Earned a grade of "B" or above in BSA 529)
BSA 571 Special Topics in Contemporary Marketing (Online-3 credits) This capstone independent course examines advanced, innovative and exploratory topics and issues within the contemporary marketing discipline.  The research topic is chosen by the student and is approved by the Instructor.  The outcome is often a secondary research report written to the quality expected for publication in a marketing textbook or periodical.  An alternative outcome is a series of smaller written papers that investigate multiple topics.  
(Prerequisite:  Completed at least three classes in the Marketing Concentration with a GPA of 3.0 or higher)

Master of Business Administration - Marketing Certificate

BSA 529 Marketing Strategies (6 weeks-3 credits) A study of advanced marketing management, both domestically and internationally. Product, price, promotion, and distribution concepts and issues will be analyzed through case studies and practical exercises. The importance of quality and customer service will be stressed. The global, legal, social, technical, economic, and competitive environments of marketing will also be studied.
BSA 567 Marketing Research (6 weeks-3 credits) This course provides an overview of the qualitative and quantitative information needs of marketing decision-making. Emphasis is placed on designing effective research projects and the techniques used for collection and analysis of primary data. Major topics include: design of research projects, survey research, observational research, questionnaire design, sampling, data collection, data analysis, and interpretation of findings. (Prerequisites: Earned a grade of "B" or above in both BSA 518 and an equivalent, and in BSA 529)
BSA 568 Marketing Response to Consumer Behavior (6 weeks-3 credits) A study of the cognitive and behavioral processes underlying consumer’s decision-making practices and buying preferences. The class addresses a variety of marketing decisions that can influence the process and generate desired buyer behavior and overall marketing objectives. (Prerequisite: Earned a grade of "B" or above in BSA 529)
BSA 569 Product & Services Brand Management (6 weeks-3 credits) The class covers the management of branded products and services. The class also covers corporate identity (e.g., government, non-profits, and individual entities that may lack defined branding). The class deals with firms that manage multiple brands as well as entrepreneurial firms that rely upon a single product/service. Key areas of investigation include brand equity, channel maximization, private-label branding, and the creative requirements for brand identification. (Prerequisite: Earned a grade of "B" or above in BSA 529)
BSA 570 Global Marketing Management (6 weeks-3 credits) This course examines the major marketing issues and opportunities facing companies who market products and services outside their domestic borders. Students will gain knowledge in the theories, strategies, and influences that drive marketing in foreign environments as well as the analytical tools required in practicing global marketing strategies. The course will concentrate on strategic decisions companies make about the 4P’s (product, price, place and promotion) in international markets. Students will acquire knowledge on global marketing environment, development of competitive strategy, global marketing strategy development, and managing global operations. (Prerequisite: Earned a grade of "B" or above in BSA 529)
BSA 571 Special Topics in Contemporary Marketing (6 weeks-3 credits) This capstone independent course examines advanced, innovative and exploratory topics and issues within the contemporary marketing discipline. The research topic is chosen by the student and is approved by the Instructor. The outcome is often a secondary research report written to the quality expected for publication in a marketing textbook or periodical. An alternative outcome is a series of smaller written papers that investigate multiple topics. (Prerequisite: Completed at least three classes in the Marketing Concentration with a GPA of 3.0 or higher)
Master of Education
ED 504 Philosophy of Education (6 weeks-3 credits) An examination and evaluation of varying philosophies and their influence on education.  The student will have the opportunity to clarify his/her position concerning basic philosophical issues in education.
ED 501 Research in Education (6 weeks-3 credits) An introduction to the fundamental methods, procedures, and materials of educational research. Emphasis will be placed on the basic designs, interpretation and recording of the information, and on the critical consumerism of research in education.
ED 502 Adolescent and Child Psychology (6 weeks-3 credits) A study of the basic concepts of the physical, mental, and personality development of the student from early childhood through adolescence.  Special attention will be given to the continuous transaction between the child’s biological organism and social-physical environment.
ED 508 The Exceptional Student (6 weeks-3 credits) The overview of special education and study of theories, characteristics, and needs of exceptional students.  Attention will be given to the historical background and legal aspects of special education, general practices for instructional programming and individual program evaluation.
ED 505 Curriculum Development (6 weeks-3 credits) A study of the principles and processes that govern curriculum planning.  Students will examine sociological, philosophical, psychological, and research foundations which impact curriculum development.  Special emphasis will be given to the role of the professional staff in the process of curriculum development and evaluation.  Students in the MAT program will complete forty hours of practicum as part of the requirements for this course.
ED 555 Models and Theories of Instructional Strategies I (6 weeks-3 credits) An exploration of the theories underlying instructional strategies appropriate for use in the classroom.  Students will examine theories of learning and models of teaching that relate to those theories.  Teaching strategies that have proven successful in a variety of disciplines and with students at various grade levels will be studied.
ED 552 Evaluation of Instructional Procedures (6 weeks-3 credits) This course is designed to provide an examination of the role of evaluation in teaching and learning in an educational setting.  Students will explore current theories, research and practices in both teaching and evaluation and will give special attention to the relationship between teaching and evaluation in providing optimum educational opportunities for students.
ED 556 Models and Theories of Instructional Strategies II (6 weeks-3 credits) A continuation of the topics begun in ED 555.  Students will discover ways of implementing appropriate models of teaching strategies at their respective grade levels and in various disciplines. Special attention will be given to ways of interrelating curriculum areas in the instructional process.
ED 500 Comprehensive Exam (1 week-0 credits) Comprehensive exam required for Master of Education candidates.  Pass/Fail.
ED 509 Instruction via Digital Media (6 weeks-3 credits) Students in today’s schools are technologically savvy.  In order to teach these students, teachers must find methods of instruction that capture their students’ attention.  Media, the computer and T.V., are two devices that do just that:  capture the attention of today’s student.  This course is designed to aid the teacher in creating course materials that can be presented by computer and video.  By using Microsoft PowerPoint and Apple’s iMovie, the student will create presentations that will include a variety of images and will be presented in a variety of formats.
ED 591 Portfolio Presentation and Assessment (6 weeks-3 credits) This course is the capstone of the GPS graduate studies in education at Averett University.  The focus of the course is on how a professional portfolio may be used to assess effectiveness.